Nature Teacher: The Natural Timing of Things

Plants wither and die

in time

as we experience it.

Everlasting physical beauty

is contrary

if not impossible

or simply a matter of perception.

Why tamper with the natural timing of life?

Shriveled leaves talk of acceptance.

They do not worry.

Crinkles speak of wisdom.

It is humans who do not understand

and self-inflict suffering,

trying to erase

a life lived

well or not.

Nature Teacher: Change

Look at the movement of the clouds

and understand

life is change.

Don’t waste your time

lamenting

things are not as they were

and will never remain so.

That is not the truth of reality.

Forever cannot be.

Look at the clouds

long stratus

puffy cumulus

and feel their struggle and joy.

Clear skies,

when things are going smoothly, no issues to deal with so to speak,

are also transitory.

Go with the flow,” others say.

The clouds already do.

 

Nature Teacher: When Love Dies…

A joyous heart in newfound love…

bleeding hearts

 

Opens freely…

Bleeding Heart

 

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paying no attention to shadowed pretense and allusion…

 

 

 

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until reckless carelessness taints the heart

and withers the spirit…

 

 

 

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leaving only an apparition, a ghostly memory

of beguiled love.

Nature Teacher: Getting Along with Others

You’ve probably been in a situation where you can’t wait to get away from someone’s toxicity.  Maybe it’s a stranger.  Maybe it’s family.  Maybe it’s your employer who you see day after day after day.  You’re not alone.  Nature deals with this too.
daffodilsDaffodils (aka narcissus or jonquils) are often the showy greeters in springtime, yet, like the attractive stranger or successful relative, we often don’t readily see their toxicity.  Daffodils contain toxic lycorine and calcium oxalate crystals and when freshly cut, they emit a virtually invisible but poisonous, gooey sap — similar to insidious commentary from passive-aggressives.  No wonder they usually appear solo in a vase.  But, you can help them get along with others!

daffodils separatedTo create a diverse but happy springtime bouquet, give daffodils a time out before introducing others to the vase.  Cut their stems at an angle and leave them by themselves in a vase of cool water overnight.

The next morning, after most of the sap has seeped out, change the water and safely add other flowers.  Then change the water every few days to maintain the harmony of this mixed bouquet.

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Nature Teacher: Apologies

Tree boughs lie pummeled to the ground,

shrubs remain paralyzed with ice

like lingering stinging words

from tormenting razor-sharp winds

and a staccato of angry snow piercing the air.

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Apologetic vivid blue skies and dazzling sunshine

appear the next day

as the bouquet offered after an argument

yet tangled branches of bewilderment remain.

Time sometimes softens deep wounds.

Some rebound.

Some do not.

 

 

Nature Teacher: We’re All in this Together

We knew the storm was coming and wondered how their fragile bodies would surviveWere there any still alive in these frigid 3 degree temps?  Topping off the bird feeders, we later fell asleep to the hush of heavy snowfall then awoke the next morning to more of the same — nearly a foot of snow and more still falling.

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A flurry of birds lined up on the tarmac of tree branches, each waiting their turn for food — the mysterious cardinal whose been pecking at the windows for a year, the usual tiny chickadees, a tufted titmouse or two, and a pudgy new family thought to be dark-eyed juncos (although they may have been plump simply to stay warm).

 

 

The feeder was nearly empty by noon…

 

 

…but my heart overflowed with gratitude

for taking time to care.