Refresh

Woman relaxing on a park bench holding a book and breathing in Spring air

Tired of hearing about the Coronavirus? Tired of hearing about my smartphone dilemma? With the National Day of Unplugging ending last weekend, I’m ready to close my Diary of Dates with a Smartphone — at least for another 11 months. So, before I get too heady with spring, here’s the last few entries (continued from March 8th…):

March 9, 2020 – Getting Smart with the Smartphone

Black and white yin and yang symbol
Taijitu

Although a self-proclaimed Neo-Luddite, I am open-minded. Sounds like an oxymoron, I know — at least until you understand my perspective. Like the Tao’s Taijitu, nothing is 100% positive or negative, good or bad, black or white, all or nothing.

I’m receptive to smartphone lovers who state their phone is a helpful tool in life; that they can control their device. These smart users view their phones as mini portable computers. That simple psychological switch in terminology generates a slightly friendlier feeling toward my Pixel 3XL. After all, I don’t want the phone telling me what to do.

Photo of various types of tools such as hammer, measuring tape, wrench

A carpenter friend barely contains his grin while telling me how he uses his smartphone. “After installing a dishwasher in a customer’s house, I sent them a photo with the bill on my smartphone. Within minutes they wired money back to my account.”

“WOW!”

That IS an awesome capability. I get it. Yet, that same tradesman refuses any temptation to use his phone while socializing. He leaves it in his truck. Sounds smart to me, and considerate.

March 10, 2020 – Something IS Wrong with this Picture and it’s Not the Camera

Five people sharing a meal together but interacting with their smartphones rather than each other

Seeing the masses blindly tethered to smartphones and not interacting with each other in person alarms me. While the numbers* and terminology vary, smartphone addiction or problematic use IS valid. I often say don’t jump in if you don’t want to jump out. Similarly, why would I try heroin knowing it’s addictive?

*Almost 21 million Americans have at least one addiction; two million are to prescription opioids. The availability of addictive sources baffles me. Until I follow the money.

A friend in AA recovery tells me, “Most coming to Twelve Step meetings these days are heroin addicts. I see them glued to their phones, scrolling, scrolling, during the meeting…not paying attention to the speaker.”

How effective is that? “Does it mean they are doubly-addicted?”

“Well, I see it as disrespectful for one thing.”

He says current day addicts revolve through the rehab’s door. “It’s big business today.  And the users wear it like a badge saying they’ve been through rehab 10-15-20 or more times…”


*TWO OUT OF EVERY THREE  people are addicted to their phone

*60% of U.S. college students have a cell phone addiction

*47% of people have tried to limit their phone use, but ONLY 30% of them SUCCEEDED


March 11, 2010 – If smartphones are so smart, why didn’t they learn any manners?

Sign indicating no cell phones and to talk outsideSigns posted at the bank and dairy store request cell users to converse outside. Sad that they have to tell people this, but at least they do. (Personally, my HSP characteristic would banish blaring TVs from waiting rooms — particularly doctor’s offices — as I find quietly reading more calm and healing.)

Yes, I admit, I’ve glared at someone loudly conversing on their phone in a medical office because I couldn’t concentrate. But, I haven’t glared at the driver sitting next to me at the red light who presumes I also want to hear their BOOM – BOOM – BOOM bass that is vibrating their car (and mine). No need for road rage, you know.

Concert attendees holding up smartphones
Photo by Nicolas LB on Unsplash

Unabashed concert attendees blind everyone else while holding up smartphones to record — or even watch — the live stage performance. Why not just stay home if they want to watch it on a screen? Didn’t I buy a ticket too to view the live performance?

 


A kindergartner on a smartphone at the school bus stop was asked, “What color is the sky?”

The child responded, “I don’t know.” (And didn’t bother to ask Google.)


March 12, 2020 – Slippery Slopes

Caution sign for slipping
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels

A Neo-Luddite country store owner relates her recent experience to me. “When I walked into a church meeting everyone was looking down at their smartphones. I asked them, ‘Do you realize a shooter could have come in and taken all of you out — that quickly?’ For a minute they looked dumbfounded…then returned to their screens.”

Feeling that chilly possibility, we acquiesce that all of us have a hand in this. From parents entertaining their toddlers with smartphones while glued to their own device, to us not (politely) commenting to store clerks interacting more with their phones than customers. Groaning together, we ponder a future ruled by a brainwashed techno culture.

“So, where do we go?” I asked.

Shrugging, then gesturing to her right she offered, “The Amish community down the road…?”


If you don’t ask, the answer is always no.

∼Nora Roberts


March 13, 2020 – No Voice, No Choice

Rants about global human issues pervade the web but common consideration in close proximity is missing. I must remind myself to let it begin with me in saying what I mean, meaning what I say and not saying it mean. That goes for glaring too. If we can’t practice common courtesy on the local level, how will we ever get to global…much less world peace?


Awareness is the first step to change because we can’t make a change unless we are aware that one needs to be made in the first place. We can then begin understanding why we are doing what we are doing.

∼ Madisyn Taylor on Daily OM


What’s so Great about a Smartphone

Oh, I did say I’d include the yang side of smartphones, didn’t I? Well, here are 20 qualities that smart users shared which I’ll admit are attractive:

  1. Graphic drawing of a red ribbonSecurity
  2. International friends (communicate for free and freely)
  3. Note-taker
  4. Map
  5. Camera
  6. Traffic information
  7. News source
  8. Tell time
  9. Calendar
  10. Track packages
  11. Text friends (although I’m concerned about eradicating the human voice)
  12. Search restaurants
  13. Learn information
  14. Watch movies
  15. Radio
  16. Flashlight
  17. Communications
  18. Music device
  19. Instant communication (not wait to get home for laptop)
  20. Numerous features, all in one place

March 14, 2020 Eggs in a Basket

Photo of wooden basket overcrowded with eggs
Photo by Rebekah Howell on Unsplash

That last attribute reminds me of the old adage “don’t put all your eggs in one basket” which, in modern times, means “don’t put your life on your smartphone.”

My walking partner called in a panic. “You’ll never believe what happened to my son today. He’s sick about it.”

“What? You don’t sound so good.”

“He was standing on the dock at the lake when his smartphone fell in. He had everything on it. And I mean EVERYTHING. His personal contacts…but worse, ALL of his business information.

“Oh no! What’s he going to do?”

“He called a skin diver. The guy tried three times. But, it’s gone. Everything’s gone. He lost his orders, billing, suppliers, payroll…”

“Doesn’t he have that at the shop?”

“It wasn’t backed up yet to the new system.”

“Oh…”

We both felt sick but not as sick as her son did. I do not understand this risk to reward ratio. Why would I hand over my life to a one-stop shop device with loitering hackers? It’s enough warding them off my PC — must I do battle on all tech fronts?

March 15, 2020 – Retraining and Playing Games

In revealing my precarious initiation with a smartphone, I’ve discovered through reviews that my Pixel may actually be faulty (repair diagnosis pending).

Smart users say they don’t do everything possible on their device, using it only for necessities. That scenario could possibly work for me — at least after it’s repaired or I get more educated. (Long, exasperated sigh.) Having to take time to learn something that was once simple — like using a phone — is a pebble in my shoe. But, by renaming the smart phone to mini portable computer, I’m more willing to get educated on a mini portable computer. No matter what, though, it has to stop bombarding me with things I don’t want or need!

Who’s Doing the Thinking?

Dark side of a planet
Photo by Drew Rae on Pexels

Now, for the yin side. If you’re unaware of the dark side of smartphones, don’t ask Alexa or Google. Ask yourself, honestly, if any of these ring true for you:

  • Feeling impatient, fretful, angry, tense, irritated, depressed or restless when not with the smartphone, or when the cell phone network or battery is low.*
  • Thinking about the smartphone even when not using it
  • Giving the cell phone more time and attention than relationships*
  • Lacking interest in other activities and hesitating to interact with people
  • Missing work due to smartphone use
  • Low concentration or productivity due to smartphone use
  • Digital eye strains and discomfort from extended periods viewing a screen*
  • Wrist, neck or back pain or problems due to excessive cell phone use*
  • Constantly checking the smartphone for fear of missing conversations on social media such as Twitter or Facebook
  • Memory decline
  • Using a smartphone for more time than intended*
  • Others notice you are using a smartphone too much
  • Refusing to give up using a smartphone even when daily life is adversely affected by it
  • Inability to be without a smartphone*

Outsmarting the Smartphone

Reclining man surrounded by technology
Photo by Ola Dapo on Pexels

*I confess to these offenses when using my PC or the internet. Personal experience burgeoned my Neo-Luddism like the reformed smoker touting the evils of their former addiction. (I am a long ago reformed smoker who can’t have just one.)

My sincere aspiration is for people to stop and think. Consciously think — for themselves about their lives, their values, and relationships, rather than mindlessly be distracted with the superficial glories of advanced technology. If I add another layer of electronic distraction, what time will be left for the garden, hand drumming, reading books, cooking and sharing with people I love?

Many addicts assume it will happen to someone else but not them. Shakespeare knew what he was talking about when he said, “To thine own self be true.” That’s best accomplished by getting quiet, away from distractions. If you fidget in silence, try walking outside (without the device) for 15 minutes a day. Then listen. Really listen — to nature, your surrounds, but most importantly that voice of truth within your self that is probably begging to be heard.

Neon sign indicating
Photo by Ivan Bertolazzi on Pexels

Attention Deficit

A few days ago, I was beginning the day with Qigong in a southeasterly room — the veggie/herb garden outside the french doors to the left, a glorious view of summer flowers (albeit wet from the rain) through the window straight ahead.  (Sadly, this summer’s extreme weather has escorted my morning Qigong practice indoors.)  Sweeping my arms up and raising my head, I stopped in disbelief.  How could I have done this? 

My indoor hibiscus plant drooped over, its leaves curled and wilted.   What in the world happened?  I just watered it a week ago.  Well, I think it was a week ago.   I know this hibiscus is temperamental, always needing more water and more frequently for it to show it’s clown-red blooms.  But, it looked so bad I didn’t know if it could be revived.  I look at the other plants lined up next to it — the lily is limp.  The begonias too.  Even the Christmas Cactus feels spongy.  Oh… 

I do not “over-nurture” my plants as some others do.  We’ve had an understanding for the last 30 or so years…I give them water upon request and they flourish.  Have they all been asking and I haven’t heard?

We’ve had an unusual summer of unbearably high humidity or heavy rain.  I thought my  “indoor” houseplants would be unaffected.  (Thankfully, after giving each of them a life restoring drink, I am relieved the hibiscus is not dying from wilt disease.) 

indoor plants 001 hibiscus

You would never know of their apparent — but honestly unintentional — neglect.)

indoor plants 002 healthy plants

Still, I ponder this “wake-up” call of nature trying to tell me something.

This spring, not long after having major surgery, a cardinal began flying into our windows.  My Animal Speak book suggested he was warning me to pay more attention to my health and well-being.  So, I added Tai Chi classes several times a week, began eating more berries and nuts, and learning how to live more effectively as an HSP.   I was already walking 3 miles with some hefty inclines a few times each week but the weather put a (hopefully temporary) damper on that too.

It’s now mid-summer and we’re surprised the cardinal is not dead.  He’s relentless — flying into windows on both sides of our house — no matter what we’ve used to detract him.  The impact of his body crashing against the glass wakes me most mornings.   What is he trying to tell me?  Did he have to employ the wilted hibiscus to get my attention?