A Language I do not Know

I do not understand the language of texting, or bar codes containing paragraphs of information.  I do not understand how people do not know how to count change, what their own phone number is, or how communication and society have morphed into a world of antonyms.

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Photo by Cheron James on Unsplash

Words such as cooperation, negotiation, impartial, conversation, politeness, and respect are no longer understood.  They have become foreign concepts in this foreign land I no longer understand.

Customer service now means self service.

A doctor visit means getting a prescription.

“Friendships” have become 1,000 or 100 strangers I don’t really know.

“Conversation” was an informal exchange of ideas but often appears as a one-sided dump.

Once upon a time a “debate” meant a public discussion of opposing arguments on a particular topic.  Today it is who can interrupt the most and shout the loudest slander.

Microwaving a prepared meal is called cooking.”

Excuse me has fallen to the wayside for immediate interruption or unacknowledged bumping into.

Here you go replaced thank you.”

Intimidating hurtful trolls lurk on “social media.

“Personal responsibility” now looks like lawsuits and blame.

Family time means individual members sitting next to each other staring into screens.

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Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

“Unbiased journalism” is dead.  Infomercials disguised as articles, and fake news abound.

Health care is really the health industry.

Publicservants are politicians passing legislation written by lobbyists.

Marketing is the sugar-coated word for lies.  Companies tout their products to take my money yet when I attempt to get help for the “failed product” it is usually in the Philippines, Dubai or any other place I can barely understand the instruction to fix the problem for the “inferior product” that was advertised as “the world’s best” that I now wish I hadn’t purchased.

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

My telephone landline use to bring news from friends or family.  Now, I cannot answer it for fear of telemarketers and scammers breaking into my home.

The tech industry told us they were making our lives simpler, less complicated, paperless, and more convenient when in truth our lives are more complicated, more disrupted, more vulnerable and disconnected, and I pay to discard more junk mail than food or household waste.

I do not recognize what I was taught in school.  Like being an American meant I was free and there was liberty and justice for all when in actuality my government sold out my rights to self-serving corporations.

America has turned topsy-turvy, upside down into a country of antonyms.  I am native to this foreign land where nothing is as it’s purported.

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Photo by Redd Angelo on Unsplash

My dictionary indicates virtual reality is not physically existing but made by software to appear to do so.”  As far as I’m concerned it’s based on a book of antonyms.  I’m not ready to discard my dictionary and thesaurus for a new reality.  I prefer to call it what it really is while I still have the mindset to know what it really is.

reality
Photo by pine watt on Unsplash

Reality – “the world or the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.”

via Daily Prompt: Foreign

I Wonder…

I wonder how healthy Americans would be if:

  • The government gave everyone $2,000/year to spend on the preventive care of their choice.
  • Western medicine would partner with the wonders of alternative, eastern, and non-traditional medicine.
  • Big Pharma and lawyers stopped advertising.
  • Insurance companies allowed patients to select their own doctor, and gave doctors enough time to develop a knowledgeable relationship with their patients.
  • Medical schools taught diet and nutrition rather than what scripts to write.
  • The primary goal of medical students was to heal.
  • Doctors changed their focus from disease to creating optimal health.
  • Health, senior and child care workers were better trained and paid.ripple effect of good health
  • Restaurants stopped super-sizing portions.
  • Government agencies denied the use of harmful chemicals, pesticides, hormones, preservatives, additives, etc. in our food supplies.
  • Politicians worked “for the people” rather than the special interests they serve.
  • Technology stopped directing people to be lazy or on overload.
  • Manufacturers produced quality products that lasted.
  • Businesses discarded voice mail and returned to employing and training “people” to help customers.
  • Hollywood stopped making violent movies and video games.
  • Parents interacted with their children as a family and limited screen time.
  • We connected with nature and respected our environment.
  • As a nation, we showed personal pride in our person and how we treat others.
  • Everyone took personal responsibility for their own health.

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Perhaps my response should have been to a Daily Prompt on “What I Know” rather than via Daily Prompt: Wonder

It’s Not Locked in Stone…

…with the key thrown away — my choice, that is.  I use to think if I made a choice I had to live with it — that there was no turning back.  That if I changed my mind it meant I was inferior.  That if I selected one thing, that that was that and that was the end of of it.  Which often meant it was the end of me.  At least until I learned, shall I say, that I could restart.  Make a new choice.  And if that didn’t fit well, make another choice.  And another if need be.  Of course changing my mind rarely happens but how freeing to know I have not sealed my life off in stone.

via Daily Prompt: Restart
Restart

Can You Feel it?

Have you ever had that Twilight Zone feeling, like when the phone rings and an inner voice says, “Don’t answer it,” only to ignore the warning and have that phone call forever change your life?  I did.  And it wasn’t for the best.  Two years later I was still recouping my life yet it would never be the same again.  And I’ve never forgotten that twinge of a haunting feeling.

Every premonition I’ve ever had gave me that familiarly eerie, back-of-the-neck hair raising, uneasy feeling that is too strong to dismiss.  And even if I mistakenly try to turn away, my reality is pin-pricked deep within because I innately know the premonition rings true.  It’s a forecast of what is to come.

Is it an angel giving me this information?  Divine guidance?  Past life, inner wisdom, or fate ingrained in my DNA?  I’ve stopped guessing the source.  It just isPay attention.  Think twice.  Be grateful for the information and heed it.
via Daily Prompt: Premonition”

Present

“Unease, anxiety, tension, stress, worry — all forms of fear — are caused by too much future, and not enough presence. Guilt, regret, resentment, grievances, sadness, bitterness, and all forms of non-forgiveness are caused by too much past, and not enough presence.” — Eckhart Tolle

 

The greatest gift from anyone is to be present.  Not just with those around you but with yourself as well.  Forget the distractions. model-2614569__480 Don’t be distracted.  The greatest gift to anyone is being present. Give the gift of being present.  To yourself, and others as well.

 

“When you have an intense contact of love with nature or another human being, like a spark, then you understand that there is no time and that everything is eternal.” – Paulo Coelho

 

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Think this little guy has anything but the present?

 

 

 

 

via Daily Prompt: Present

Daily Prompt: Meager

There they were,  in plain sight — my car keys laying on the driver’s seat and cell phone plugged into the charger.  In the midst of holiday shopping, with several more stops to go, I wanted to get home before heavy traffic stole more time.  Oh well.

The biting cold stung my uncovered ears and head — my hat lay on the passenger seat too.  Walking back into the dollar store, I asked the cashier if I could use the phone because I locked my keys in the car.   The skinny, high-school looking girl asked her manager if I could use the phone.   I dialed home.  Busy.  Now what?

girl looking up blurReading my anxiety over tieing up the store’s phone and her time, the girl’s colossal black olive eyes looked up at me, “Do you have Triple A?” she asked.

“No.  No, I don’t.”  I didn’t tell her I gave it up years ago when the price kept increasing and they appeared more interested in selling travel plans than providing road side assistance.  Instead, I’d obtained the same service through my car insurance but alas, that information was also in my locked car.  Sigh.

“Well, I do.   You can use mine,” she said while reaching for her purse under the checkout stand.

“I don’t want to get you in trouble.”

“It’s okay.  I’ve been through this.  I know what it’s like,” she smiled, her teeth jutting  from sunken cheekbones confined by strands of fine hair barely warming her bony shoulders.  Pulling out her AAA card, she showed me the account number and phone number to call.  I felt surprised and relieved all at once.

Someone finally responded at Triple AAA and after I provided the required information, told me they would arrive in 45 minutes to an hour.  The young clerk told me to just sign her name when the serviceman arrived but that I should wait inside the warm store.  I don’t know if I was more stunned by her blind trust in me or her thoughtfulness in today’s self-involved world.

“Thank you.  Thank you for your kindness.  I so appreciate it,” I said.  She waved off my offer of a $20 bill even though she most likely earns a $7.25 minimum wage.  I insisted, “Please.  You’ve been so generous in helping me.”  Her wide smile reappeared, and I walked away thinking…

Isn’t life interesting how our needs are met?

grateful help outline

via Daily Prompt:  Meager

Featured image:  unsplash-logoMitchel Lensink

Original image (modified) of girl:unsplash-logoAlexander Mils

Daily Prompt: Gratitude

I didn’t think much about gratitude while growing up.  Actually, I’d say I was pretty ungrateful in those years.  Raised in a dysfunctional family — although I didn’t know that’s what it was then, just that my father would rage at a moment’s notice — we often ran for our lives.  Literally.  It wasn’t until I married a man in a 12-step program that I considered the word gratitude.

While my new husband’s recovery from prescription painkillers opened the Al-Anon door for me,  I couldn’t relate to others struggling with loved ones’ active addictions because my husband already had three drug-free years when we met.  In times of angst, I turned to gardening but it couldn’t eradicate a darkness I felt deep within.  And then I found a different 12-step meeting — ACOA.  For the first time in my life I felt I belonged, and tasted true fellowship.

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Listening to others traumas from similar or worse upbringings lessened the impact of my own.  I now realized my family wasn’t the only one that didn’t look like Norman Rockwell Freedom from Want or Freedom from Fear paintings.  Feeling safe and unjudged, I unveiled the shame that overshadowed three decades of my life.  I now understood my father as a rageaholic and how this ill-affected our family.  (This is the early 1990’s before recovery became a buzzword and rehabs became multi-million dollar businesses.)

Twelve Step meetings — of any kind — frequently discuss gratitude and suggest keeping a gratitude journal to heal the spirit.  My gratitude can be as simple as I’m grateful the sun is shining, for the joy my dog gives to me, or for my eyes to see the beauty around me.  It is a daily prompt in my thoughts illuminating my heart.

A gift of the Twelve Steps is learning to live life instead of just surviving,  existing,  staying sober or stopping an addiction.  Hearing someone share, “I was so busy looking at the thorns that I didn’t see the rose,” changed my life forevermore.  I now look for gifts in unanticipated circumstances rather than see challenges as problems.   The more I became grateful, the more I’ve had to be grateful for.

A few more decades later, I’m still evolving and learning other shades of gratitude.  I’ve come to realize and feel grateful that the darkness of my youth led me to 12-step recovery.  The Twelve Steps expanded my spirituality and lessened my fears to try new things and be who I really am.  I evolved to become passionate about hand drumming which led to my interest in the Tao.  My understanding of the Tao and life grows through gardening.  Coming full circle, I more fully understand and am grateful for all the layers of my life.  As my 12-step friend once told me, “The gift is as great as the pain.”