The Giving Circle

Black and white border collie lying in the snow intentlyawaiting a Frisbee toss

via The 2019 Christmas Charity Appeal – Help Me Raise £250 For Battersea Dogs & Cats Home By Leaving Me Links To Your Blogs and Books

As I’ve posted in the last few months, my beloved border collie Bess was the love of my life. She gave me 14.5 years of unconditional love, companionship, and fun. As I continue mourning her loss, I reach out for other canines (and four-legged friends) in need of help because there is no one to speak up for them.

At this giving time of year the tag line at the end of my e-mails asks folks to consider donating to a pet shelter. This morning, I read this very worthy post on a 2019 Christmas Charity Appeal for dogs and cats that also offers to help bloggers. Seems like a wonderful circle of giving.  I hope you will join in too.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays

to You and All of Our Beloved Furry Critters

Tomato Companions

Well, they may not be very mannerly — inviting themselves along — but they can be cheery company.

I didn’t plant tomatoes this year and had no intentions of doing so — either before or after my early June trip to Scotland. My gardening enthusiasm this season was lost with Bess, knowing she would no longer be with me. For the last 14 years, we cherished our outdoor turf together — she bringing her Frisbee to me while I tended the gardens. Being outside now felt too empty without her.

But, Mother Nature had other ideas. When I returned to discover tomato seedlings all over the asparagus patch — undoubtedly from seeds hiding in the compost, those unsought tomato plants beckoned me. After replanting the strongest ones in their own section I thought That’s it. If they can thrive on their own they will. I’m not going to spend much more time out here this summer…

Soon though, I mixed up Epsom salt fertilizer for a few weekly treatments and let Nature take its course. Sufficient summer rainfall eliminated my need for watering every day. As the plants grew taller and taller, I got the stakes and ties out. In a few more weeks, the green fruit gladdened a little part of me. Basil went in next as a companion plant and also for the makings of bruschetta, caprese salad, and a tasty pasta dish (although I’d cut way down on carbs, at least before Scotland).

Baskets and trays of cherery, grape and plum tomatoes
This week’s tomato harvest…and there’s still more.

For the last month I’ve been inundated with tomatoes.  Cherry tomatoes. Grape tomatoes. Half dollar size tomatoes that I don’t recall planting in previous years.  Some plum tomatoes and a few beefsteaks also appeared. I’ve given away baskets, bags and trays full and still have more on my counter, in the freezer, and on the vine. I never intended to grow tomatoes this season but they apparently intended to accompany me.

There’s something to be said for nature’s curative energy. Whether it’s the thrill of getting my hands in the dirt after the spring thaw, or the excitement of watching something grow, or the serene feeling of sunlight and fresh air, the only dialogue from bees and birds in the quiet of the day. In mourning Bess, I turned away from the solace of the gardens, disremembering it is their natural nurturing that made me a gardener in the first place. And when there’s a bountiful harvest? Well, the joy of giving brings about a smile — for the receiver and for me.


Featured image by Lukas Bieri from Pixabay

Can You Love More than One Day?

Pets are on my mind.  I’ve finished viewing “The Truth about Pet Cancer” which I alerted you to in my previous post “Your Pet Trusts You.”  And with today being National Pet Day I’m thinking about these beloved creatures more than usual.   According to PetSecure.com, “Americans spend over $50 billion annually on their pets, and 36% give their dogs birthday presents.”  But why wait for one special day when animals freely give us their love, forgiveness and attention 365 days, year after year after year?

Don’t have, or can’t have a pet you say?  It doesn’t matter.  Approximately 7.6 million companion animals enter American animal shelters every year.  These animals don’t have a pet parent or pet guardian — their only hope is caring humans.  Cats and dogs come in varied sizes, so are the ways you can help.  Here’s some options:

dog-hugShop on Amazon Smile and get 0.5% of your purchase donated to a 501(c)(3) pet charity registered on their site.   Even better, buy some pet supplies via Amazon Smile then donate them to your local SPCA, no-kill shelter or rescue group.

dog hug soldier

Support no-kill shelters.  Look for no-kill shelters in your area:  https://www.nokillnetwork.org/no-kill-animal-shelters.php

horse-hug girl

Aid rescue groups.  Some rescue groups are breed specific:

http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/maps/feral-cat-groups/feral_cats_list.html

https://www.habitatforhorses.org/state-national-rescue-links/

For some tips on rescue groups visit:  http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/dog-breeds-breed-specific-rescue-group-adoption-tips or http://www.avianwelfare.org/links/organizations.htm

dog hug boyAssist with dog transport and save the life of a dog on death row:

FreedomTrainTransports: http://freedomtraintransports.com

If you’re on FB or Yahoo, take a look at these sites to see what you can do:

Animal Rescue Transport Network: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Rescue-Transport-Network/117998798306519

Rescue Angels on Wheels: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RescueAngelsonWheels

goat hug ladyHelp find homes for orphaned pets by signing-up for Shelter Pet PR and promoting the pets on your social media site:  https://www.dosomething.org/us/campaigns/shelter-pet-pr

And what about that beloved pet you do have?  I thought I gave good care — at least until I realized that Big Farma and Big Pharma have also corrupted the pet food and medical “industries.”  Remember, your animal friend relies on you to give them the best of health. It’s not that difficult (and you’ll become healthier too).

 

Feed a breed-specific diet and the best diet you can afford.  For instance, use quality canned food for cats who can dehydrate easily and need more moisture; and if your dog can’t tolerate a totally raw diet, select kibble without soy, corn or rice, and is preferably organic.  Supplement a few times each week with raw meat-based scraps and chopped brightly colored veggies like spinach, kale, broccoli and carrots.  Blueberries and even a raw egg now and then are good too.  Just skip the pizza crust and other highly processed foods!  That includes colored food treats too.

Offer plenty of clean water — spring or distilled rather than fluoridated city water — in metal or ceramic bowls.  (Get rid of plastic dishes.)

Play with nontoxic toys, get lots of exercise and sunshine!

Consult a holistic vet especially if your pet buddy is already not feeling well.  They are trained to help pets achieve quality living without costly surgeries, pharmaceuticals or side effects:  https://www.ahvma.org/find-a-holistic-veterinarian/

Bess still thanks me for taking her for acupuncture.  In two treatments she was running like a pup again — even though she was 11 (and now doing well at 13).  She’s not leaving a spec behind of the raw purple cabbage and kale with flaxseed oil and organic raw chicken added to her kibble!

Include animals in your will.  If you have a chunk of cash to leave behind, consider naming a charitable pet organization in your will.  None of us will be here forever so make sure your pets will be cared for in the event you depart first.  For some helpful info, visit: https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/protect-your-prized-pet-create-a-pet-trust or https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/pet-trusts.html

Of course, the standbys of donating money, supplies, and volunteering your time are always needed.  Hopefully, National Pet Day is the kickstart for you helping animals all year long — just like the love they give to us every day.

Oh, and if you missed National Hug Your Dog Day yesterday (4/10) — just give them a hug every day too.